zachklein:

Another intriguing ramification is the production of data. Quantifying ourselves with Tweets and Tumbles and Check-ins is already popular, but I wonder how close to Felton we’ll get. I suppose we’re quickly moving to a point where we all commonly share good data. A massive frontier, I believe, is the development of interfaces that allow us to capture, share and read this kind of data. The kind that makes us look productive in a vast sense of the word.

The first comment on that…

It’s been an exciting year at Hot Potato. Since going live last November, we’ve been inspired and energized by your reaction to the service and people’s appetite for socializing around activities and live events.

Today, we’re thrilled to announce that some of the features and thinking behind Hot…

I’m looking forward to life in Palo Alto, working with the Facebook team. Very excited for whats next! 

yes, please.
jessicabigarel:

Via a conversation with Zach Klein, Brian Jacobs, and Aaron Sittig at Marlow & Sons in 2009.

yes, please.

jessicabigarel:

Via a conversation with Zach Klein, Brian Jacobs, and Aaron Sittig at Marlow & Sons in 2009.

Seen recently at Hot Potato HQ.

Seen recently at Hot Potato HQ.

Where’s Zach?

Where’s Zach?

Sunset last night from the office in Williamsburg. I love it here.

Sunset last night from the office in Williamsburg. I love it here.

?

!

this is why i love matt langer.
langer:

So I had a little fun with my latest project at work.
Every business realizes at some point that Google Analytics sucks but gets away with sucking because it’s Google and it’s free. We were looking to get a better view of our viral-specific traffic, and rather than wrestle with GA or try to plug in to another service we decided to farm our own data. It was up to me to figure out how best to do this.
My first step was to build our own vanity URL shortener, functionality we would definitely need because Twitter is one of our three main viral channels. I wasn’t comfortable with plugging into the API at bit.ly or anywhere else because I didn’t want to have to rely on another service for the longevity of our links. Plus, by doing it myself I not only got to build my own base-62 converter (fun!), but now whenever a user hits our server to expand that base-62 shortened URL I get full server-side control of the rest of that click’s lifetime. I know if that URL went out via Twitter or Facebook or email, I know its incoming referrer (if it differs from the original channel), and most importantly, I know the unique user session of whoever clicked on it.
Now, with a unique session in hand, I built a JavaScript tracker to capture a complete view of that first user experience. I record the entire map of their initial visit, including which site features they used, whether they created an account, and about a dozen other properties that interest us, all of which builds out a very important picture of customer acquisition and conversion. It also helps us gauge the respective value of these three separate viral media and track their performance over time as we tweak the ways we interact with them.
I was also asked to build a live dashboard so that we could hang a 50-inch LCD on one of the walls and get a realtime view of our incoming viral traffic. And while I find analytics and metrics and viral coefficients to be pretty interesting stuff, my cynical half can’t help but see it as all a lot of snake oil. In deference to this latter point I decided to name the tool the “VIRAL SCIENCE LABORATORY”, since I hear “viral scientists” are the new “social media experts”.
They don’t usually let me do much design around here. This might be why.
(full version here)
—
[ed note: the numbers pictured above are just my local testing data, not a representative view]

this is why i love matt langer.

langer:

So I had a little fun with my latest project at work.

Every business realizes at some point that Google Analytics sucks but gets away with sucking because it’s Google and it’s free. We were looking to get a better view of our viral-specific traffic, and rather than wrestle with GA or try to plug in to another service we decided to farm our own data. It was up to me to figure out how best to do this.

My first step was to build our own vanity URL shortener, functionality we would definitely need because Twitter is one of our three main viral channels. I wasn’t comfortable with plugging into the API at bit.ly or anywhere else because I didn’t want to have to rely on another service for the longevity of our links. Plus, by doing it myself I not only got to build my own base-62 converter (fun!), but now whenever a user hits our server to expand that base-62 shortened URL I get full server-side control of the rest of that click’s lifetime. I know if that URL went out via Twitter or Facebook or email, I know its incoming referrer (if it differs from the original channel), and most importantly, I know the unique user session of whoever clicked on it.

Now, with a unique session in hand, I built a JavaScript tracker to capture a complete view of that first user experience. I record the entire map of their initial visit, including which site features they used, whether they created an account, and about a dozen other properties that interest us, all of which builds out a very important picture of customer acquisition and conversion. It also helps us gauge the respective value of these three separate viral media and track their performance over time as we tweak the ways we interact with them.

I was also asked to build a live dashboard so that we could hang a 50-inch LCD on one of the walls and get a realtime view of our incoming viral traffic. And while I find analytics and metrics and viral coefficients to be pretty interesting stuff, my cynical half can’t help but see it as all a lot of snake oil. In deference to this latter point I decided to name the tool the “VIRAL SCIENCE LABORATORY”, since I hear “viral scientists” are the new “social media experts”.

They don’t usually let me do much design around here. This might be why.

(full version here)

[ed note: the numbers pictured above are just my local testing data, not a representative view]

Bastille Day on Smith Street. Vive la France!

Bastille Day on Smith Street. Vive la France!

chelsaskees:

Osaka Loop Line - Discovery
Anne’s dinner followed by a lovely evening with friends old and new last thursday. Really enjoying the new 5D Mark II. Here are some photos from the evening:
ihardlyknowher or flickr

Anne’s dinner followed by a lovely evening with friends old and new last thursday. Really enjoying the new 5D Mark II. Here are some photos from the evening:

ihardlyknowher or flickr

stephaniewei:
(via littlemiss)
me too.

stephaniewei:

(via littlemiss)

me too.

Many thanks to Nick Gray for hosting a most excellent tea party last night featuring great music by the Freelance Whales.
Some photos for your perusal from the evening:
ihardlyknowher or flickr

Many thanks to Nick Gray for hosting a most excellent tea party last night featuring great music by the Freelance Whales.

Some photos for your perusal from the evening:

ihardlyknowher or flickr

This is worth reading. Comments from Rob May on an issue thats been on my mind for some time, especially as at the moment I’m doing a lot of thinking on how to leverage micropublishing/commentary/existing media to benefit the audiences of live events more holistically than twitter’s interface or others are today.

This is of course as much about creation as it is about consumption, and implies that we believe that given the right set of tools, documenting (and ultimately interacting with) a live event via the audience and making it compelling is reasonable and possible, and can add significantly to the singular perspective provided via the media today.

I think that there is an interesting intersection between conversation and shared context/perspective around collective interest in something real-time. Time will tell if this is actually the case.

Does this mean that the sum of all of the inane commentary on twitter is interesting beyond novelty? I doubt it. What I think is more likely is that the tools and incentives to create lasting contributions will evolve.

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Themed by: Hunson